What It Takes To Be a Friend

Yesterday, I talked about teaching our kids to be careful who they call a friend. In the midst of a discussion about this with my oldest daughter, it got me thinking about what it takes to be a true friend.

Being conscientious of what it takes to be a good friend causes a person to look for those same traits in the people they call friends. But when it comes to kids, it also takes regular conversation about the subject to keep it fresh in their minds.

Role playing is a practical way to walk through real life scenarios. It helps kids see possible outcomes and ways to navigate various situations. In Lexi’s case, we brainstormed ways to respond to a similar situation as the one I shared yesterday without being taken advantage of.

What does it take to be a good friend?

Build Trust

  • By being reliable. Do what you say you’re going to do. Be where say you’re going to be. Let your yes be yes and you no be no.

  • Be consistent. Be the same to everyone everyday.

  • Be just. Defend what’s right and stand up against what’s wrong no matter who is involved.

  • Tell the truth.

  • Don’t gossip.

  • Don’t show favoritism in a group.

  • Don’t let your friends be left out.

Show Honor & Respect

  • Put others first. Let them go first in line. Offer a helping hand. Listen more than you talk, and show genuine interest in what they say.

  • Don’t push others down to elevate yourself.

  • Don’t be sarcastic. Check our blog on the difference between sarcasm and facetiousness. http://63.141.231.92/?s=sarcasm

Loyalty

  • Stand up for what’s right.

  • Be willing to work through conflict and not give up on a friendship.

Acceptance

  • Embrace differences without compromising morals. Your friends don’t have dress the way you do and like all the same things you like. Give each other space to be unique.

  • You don’t always have to agree with your friends, but always respect their opinion.

  • Learn how to enjoy different personality types.

Stop back in on Monday. I’m going to talk about teaching kids to be proactive and approachable as they seek out new friendships.

Jody Hagaman

Jody Hagaman and her husband Tony have three kids, ages 18 to 30 and one precious baby grandchild. Jody’s story of how her son asked to be homeschooled has inspired
tens of thousands of families around the nation. A true homeschooling success story, that son is now an attorney in New Hampshire and is the New England Regional Director of The Concord Coalition, a bipartisan
organization dedicated to advocating responsible fiscal policy.

As a community leader, Jody has served on the board of directors of many local non-profit organizations. Her work experience as a corrections officer on a crisis intervention team inspired her to make a difference in the lives of the next generation.

She and Jenni co-host a weekly radio show, write a syndicated weekly column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about living on purpose with excellence and raising kids with the end result in mind.

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Jody Hagaman and her husband Tony have three kids, ages 18 to 30 and one precious baby grandchild. Jody’s story of how her son asked to be homeschooled has inspired
tens of thousands of families around the nation. A true homeschooling success story, that son is now an attorney in New Hampshire and is the New England Regional Director of The Concord Coalition, a bipartisan
organization dedicated to advocating responsible fiscal policy.

As a community leader, Jody has served on the board of directors of many local non-profit organizations. Her work experience as a corrections officer on a crisis intervention team inspired her to make a difference in the lives of the next generation.

She and Jenni co-host a weekly radio show, write a syndicated weekly column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about living on purpose with excellence and raising kids with the end result in mind.