You CAN Add More Time to Your Day

Everything we do requires a choice. We make choices when we wake up, eat food, get dressed, answer the phone — it’s all a choice. Although our choices are not always contemplated or obvious, they are choices nonetheless. And if we don’t choose our tasks and time deliberately, we can unknowingly allow important things to slip through the cracks.

We often hear people say they wish they had more hours in a day. Well, the experts say that for every one minute you spend planning, you will gain ten in execution. WOW! Over time, those minutes add up. You can do the math. So now the question is – Are we going to take the time to plan, and if so, how do we plan?

Start With the End Result in Mind

Time management is about starting with the end result in mind, and then working backward to achieve our goals. That’s really what this is about — setting goals and then figuring out our priorities. If we don’t do this, life just seems to happen to us, and years slip past us without any real significant achievements to speak of.

Jody Hagaman

Jody Hagaman and her husband Tony have three kids, ages 18 to 30 and one precious baby grandchild. Jody’s story of how her son asked to be homeschooled has inspired
tens of thousands of families around the nation. A true homeschooling success story, that son is now an attorney in New Hampshire and is the New England Regional Director of The Concord Coalition, a bipartisan
organization dedicated to advocating responsible fiscal policy.

As a community leader, Jody has served on the board of directors of many local non-profit organizations. Her work experience as a corrections officer on a crisis intervention team inspired her to make a difference in the lives of the next generation.

She and Jenni co-host a weekly radio show, write a syndicated weekly column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about living on purpose with excellence and raising kids with the end result in mind.

More Posts

Aim Kids For Success With Project Management Skills

The corporate and the academic worlds are moving toward a more project-based environment. So as our kids grow up, they’re going to need strong project management skills, and we can begin teaching them some of the basics by showing them how to look at their to do list to find mini projects: papers for school, putting together a vendor booth for their small business, planning a birthday party.

What Has to Be Done?

  • Teach kids to ask, “What exactly needs to be done?”
  • They should be clear and concise because being vague clouds vision.
  • Then they should define any related goals and be specific.

My fifteen year old has a successful henna tattoo business, and she gets a good amount of business from booths at various fairs and events around town. For these booths, she has to have a table with good signage. She needs pictures of her work, brochures, business cards and pricing information. Her goal is obviously to do tattoos at the event and make money, but it’s also to network for future business. That means she has to provide information on these wedding venues greenville sc, pregnancy belly tattoos and home parties (which tend to bring in good money). Her goal is to leave an event with at least three bookings — one to replace that day’s event and two to grow her business.

When our kids are defining their goals and tasks, they need to think about what they want the end result to look like.

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of seven kids (ages 1 to 20) including one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

More Posts

Help Your Kids Find a Business Idea

Most parents love the idea of their kids making their own money, and who wouldn’t want their kids to gain the life skills that come from running a business? But the first obstacle that most families face is coming up with a business idea.

This Saturday we’re kicking off a radio series on this very topic. Our guest is Certified Public Accountant Carol Topp who wrote a curriculum for families called Micro Business For Teens. We launched this series with a newspaper column about preparing kids for the real world. Speaking of which, if you haven’t already joined the group by the same name, head over there now and jump in on the conversation.

Start With What They Love

The first step in helping kids find a business is figuring out what they enjoy and what they’re good at. Our kids knit and spin their own yarn. So for a season, they made some money selling knitted items. In fact, one summer my daughter raised $300 making and selling knitted owls.

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of seven kids (ages 1 to 20) including one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

More Posts

Are You Raising Kids Who Will Do Hard Things?

Ever have this happen in your house: your kid is beaming with excitement over their new activity/hobby/idea, only to throw in the towel once they figure out they aren’t rock stars at it and that they actually have to practice to be any good?

Why does this happen? Because it’s not in most people’s nature (especially kids) to want to do hard things. But that places us, the parents, in a pickle. Do we make them stick out or do we let them quit? We want to teach them that you have to practice to become good at something, but we don’t want to force a square peg into a round hole and make them stick it out when it’s not their “thing?” It’s quite the conundrum, isn’t it?

Every family has a different way of dealing with this, but in the Hagaman and Stahlmann houses, we have a one semester minimum for a new activity because kids need to spend some time with a thing to figure out whether or not it’s a good fit.

At the root of many of the cries to quit is an unwillingness to work hard, and we need to fight against it. But we, the parents, need to first change our own mindset.

Jenni and Jody

Jenni and Jody

Jenni and Jody are Christian, homeschooling moms with ten kids between them (ages 1 to 30), including one on the autism spectrum, plus one baby grandchild. Together they host a weekly syndicated parenting radio show, write a weekly newspaper column, freelance for a variety of publications, teach parenting and homeschooling workshops and seminars, speak at conventions and conferences and coach individual families. They are passionate about encouraging and equipping families to Parent On Purpose (POP) with the end result in mind.

More Posts

Inspired By Garbage

When was the last time you took a good look at the possibilities in your garbage can?

Last week we talked about helping our kids find their passion and pursue it earnestly. This week, we’re turning our attention to kids who have done just that.

Here in Sarasota, there’s a group of five teens who have become local celebrities because of the treasure they found in their trash. They call themselves The Garbage Men, and they are a cover band who plays mostly classics from the 50s, 60s and 70s using instruments that they made entirely out of garbage!

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of seven kids (ages 1 to 20) including one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

More Posts

Out-Of-The-Box U

So, you’re starting to figure out what your kids are super interested in, maybe even passionate about. (If you’re not quite there yet, check out yesterday’s post for some inspiration.)

Now what? Where do you go with this information, and how do you help your kids dive deep into their interests without having to remortgage your house?

There are awesome opportunities tucked away in hidden places that you might not think about. You’ll have to be willing to do some research and log some miles on your car, but it’s totally worth it.

Hidden Treasures in Museums and Libraries

When I lived in NJ (Jenni speaking), we were members of the Newark Museum, and a few times a year, the museum offered inexpensive but awesome classes. One daughter, who was about eight at the time, took a jewelry making class.

The instructor would take the kids to a specific location in the museum where the kids would study a particular art form from a different time period and culture. Then they’d return to the classroom and make jewelry inspired by what they’d studied. The stuff they produced was way beyond anything she would have ever made at home. In fact, one of her pieces won second place at the county fair, and it was judged along with adult entries.

One of my sons took a digital photography class that trained his eye to look for art in the world around him. I remember one day in particular when the whole class went outside and spent the day photographing only shadows.

Another son, my resident scientist at the time, took a slime class. They spent the whole six week session making all kinds of polymers that they could play with.

Libraries can also have hidden opportunities. Some have teen knitting groups. Some offer master gardener classes or special guest speakers. Kids can learn all about bats or participate in an African music class or join a Lego club. Some libraries offer business help for young entrepreneurs or American Red Cross Babysitting Certification classes. One year, my daughter won a $50 gift certificate just for writing a winning book review through our local library.

Google Is Your Best Friend

You can find all sorts of treasures by simply making Google your best friend. So, let’s say you have a child interested in photography like I do (Jody speaking). Go to Google and search for local clubs, free workshops and photography studios that offer classes.

This summer one of my daughters is taking a few summer workshops at Ringling School of Art. What she has learned in these few weeks is irrefutably key to her future success as a photographer. She is also following bloggers who are experts in the field, mimicking their different styles and techniques and mastering her craft. This is one of the many ways to help your kids become experts in what they’re passionate about.

My other daughter was convinced she wanted to own a bakery. We found out that Michael’s Arts and Crafts Store offers cake decorating classes. So, for her birthday, the entire family bought her everything she needed to bake unique cakes and cupcake accessories and all the tools to create her own little bake shop, and my sister purchased the first round of classes for her.

It was one of the best things we ever did, and we all enjoyed her delectable desserts. Yes, I had to diet once she exhausted her passion for that field. But, what she learned was irreplaceable. She figured out that she loved to bake and make specialty desserts, but only for special occasions. This was NOT something she wanted to do for a living. Good thing we figured that out in middle school and not in business college!

Look for local stores that sell supplies for your child’s interest and see if they offer classes. My daughter (Jenni here) has her own henna tattoo business. She gets her supplies from a store in Orlando, which is about two hours from our house. Next month, we’re heading up there for a full day of henna classes to help her hone her skills. While she’s there, she plans to rub elbows with some other artists and find out new ways to get more business.

Oddly enough, Skyler’s whole henna business was birthed out of a desire to take an art class. She’s an artsy kid by nature, but she wasn’t satisfied with her drawing ability. That one class opened a whole new world for her. Check out her henna designs here

Hidden Treasures in Your City

Do you have any historic societies or science centers in your community? Get on their mailing lists and find out what they’re doing. You might unearth some great treasures.

Does your city offer opera, orchestra, dance, live theater or bazaars? How about art shows? Are there galleries? What about restaurants (sometimes restaurant owners will let your kids tour the kitchen and make their own food).

Mark your calendar for the county fair and any other fairs your town might offer.  Get people’s business cards, and see if they’ll let you visit their farm or work studio.

Experiences fuel passion, and the people who are living and breathing their craft are great resources for helping us give our kids specialized experiences. Which leads us to this…

Sailing on the Right Ships: Mentorships, Internships and Apprenticeships

Contact local zoos, aquariums, botanical gardens and other specialized attractions in your area, and see if they offer official internship programs.

Find a professional in your child’s field of interest who will allow him to job shadow for a few days. If it goes well, talk to the person about possibly mentoring your child.

Travel Required

Jenni and I have done some pretty crazy things to get our kids to places so they can have an experience that will fuel their passion . . . but I think we’re called to do that.

When Chase, my oldest son, was in middle school, we knew he wanted to pursue a career in law and politics. Politics was not my specialty, but this boy couldn’t get enough of it. I knew I had to get him to places where he could learn first-hand what it was all about. So, with two little ones in tow, I drove ninety minutes each way for five days in a row to get him to our state capital in Springfield, IL so that he could participate in a week long camp that would teach him about our political system and allow him to network with representatives and senators in our home state.

Well, that laborsome effort definitely paid off. Out of that experience, Chase was given an opportunity to work for our senator during the summer (his office was only twenty minutes from us – whew!), page for him later at the capital and later campaign for a representative in Missouri. Well, that passion at 12 years old catapulted him into law school and has turned into a career placing him with a group of attorneys that bring awareness to the Federal Budget.

But these trips don’t have to be a total wash for mom and dad. When Jenni and I take her daughter Skyler up to Orlando next month for a day of henna boot camp, we’re going to spend the day at a nearby cafe with WiFi working on our keynote talks for a 2015 homeschool convention (and we’ll manage to squeeze in some fun too). But if you want to work at home, just make sure you have this Wi-Fi Router to get the best speeds.

Summer Camps

Specialized summer camps can have a steep price tag, but they can be a great investment in your kid’s future. My daughter Skyler (Jenni speaking) wants to be a vocal recording artist. A number of top music schools offer intensive summer programs that will not only build skills and experience, but it will allow her to make valuable connections with working artists.

One of my sons wants to be a filmmaker in the military. The New York film academy offers middle and high schoolers camps with A-List producers, directors, screenwriters and actors.

There are excellent summer opportunities for nearly every interest.

We’re going to talk more about this and how to help your kids get into their first choice school this Saturday at 10:00AM on Parenting On Purpose With Jenni and Jody. We’ll be talking about how finding our kids’ passion is instrumental in preparing them for their future.

Sarasota locals can catch us on 1220AM, 106.9FM or 98.9FM, but anyone can listen in on live streaming on WSRQ or get directions to download a mobile app and listen on the go.

 

Jenni and Jody

Jenni and Jody

Jenni and Jody are Christian, homeschooling moms with ten kids between them (ages 1 to 30), including one on the autism spectrum, plus one baby grandchild. Together they host a weekly syndicated parenting radio show, write a weekly newspaper column, freelance for a variety of publications, teach parenting and homeschooling workshops and seminars, speak at conventions and conferences and coach individual families. They are passionate about encouraging and equipping families to Parent On Purpose (POP) with the end result in mind.

More Posts

How are You Preparing Your Child For the Real World?

Facebook users, we have an AWESOME new group that’s all about preparing our kids for the real world. We want your voice and opinions and ideas, and we’d love for you to ask questions of the community and brainstorm with them.

This community is growing so quickly! We’ve added almost 500 people in the first few hours of it’s existence. Log into Facebook, join the group and invite your friends!

Here’s some info about the group:

This is a community for people who want to share ideas, ask questions and offer information that will help build the kind of skills kids need to succeed in the real world.

The goal of this community is simply to work together in raising kids who have REAL WORLD life skills — the stuff they probably won’t get in school (how to balance a checkbook, buy a house, grow a garden, learn about alternative energy, patent a product and bring it to market, harness social media for a purpose, etc.).

We’re here to talk about HOW and WHY to raise:

  • entrepreneurs
  • good communicators
  • civic-minded people
  • effective activists
  • debt-free, financially wise stewards of our planet
  • world changers
  • people who can manage their own thoughts, emotions and choices well
  • emotionally healthy people

We’re here to brainstorm together, offer ideas, ask questions and share information about:

  • how to help our kids start a business
  • how to teach our kids about our free market system
  • how to raise kids who will know how to cast an informed vote
  • how to help find their passion
  • how to nurture their passion
  • how to teach our kids to advocate effectively for what they believe in
  • how help kids negotiate well
  • how to teach kids good conflict management
  • you get the idea!

Did you join yet? Do it now, and share this post. See you on Facebook!

Jenni and Jody

Jenni and Jody

Jenni and Jody are Christian, homeschooling moms with ten kids between them (ages 1 to 30), including one on the autism spectrum, plus one baby grandchild. Together they host a weekly syndicated parenting radio show, write a weekly newspaper column, freelance for a variety of publications, teach parenting and homeschooling workshops and seminars, speak at conventions and conferences and coach individual families. They are passionate about encouraging and equipping families to Parent On Purpose (POP) with the end result in mind.

More Posts

Get a Leg Up on Life This Summer

Over the past few days, we’ve been talking about investing rather than spending your kids’ summer. We covered using the summer to boost academics and to pursue passion. Today, we’re wrapping up this short series with a look at ways to invest your child’s summer by building life skills.

Clearly all of this is going to take some planning. If you wait for summer to come and then just sort of let each day happen to you, it’s pretty unlikely that you’ll accomplish much. So, take a Saturday, and make some plans. Be deliberate. Parent On Purpose!

The summer is a great time to teach your kids important life skills, such as how to change a tire and the car’s oil, how to do research on the Internet (it dawned on me one year, when I was working on project with my 8-year-old, that kids aren’t born knowing how to Google), how to make travel arrangements, how to sew, can vegetables, do laundry…you get the idea.

But what if you don’t know how to do these things? Honestly, I don’t even know how to turn on a sewing machine. It’s pathetic, I know, especially for a homeschool mom. But the truth is, I didn’t grow up in a very domestic family. We were plenty cultured. Having grown up right outside of Manhattan, I spent my childhood at museums and art galleries, seeing Broadway shows and ballets and symphonies. My grandmother took me to Lincoln Center to see La Boheme, and we spent many weekends at art festivals.

Living in the Hudson Valley of New York also meant that I got to do some cool outdoorsy things. I went skiing in the winters, hiked mountains, went parasailing and camping, but there was also a lot that we didn’t do.

I never really learned how to garden or sew or bake. My mom was a master knitter and crocheter, but she never taught me, and I suppose I never asked. Those were just things she did. Actually, I do knit now, but it was my daughter who taught me!

I don’t want my kids to grow up without these important life skills, so I’m learning along side them. YouTube makes just about any skill accessible!

The summer is a great time for kids to start a business. They can baby sit, mow lawns, walk dogs, or make and sell things. Two years ago, my daughter funded a trip by earning $300 knitting and selling the cutest owls you’ve ever seen. Now she does henna tattoos to make money.

Want to give them solid business skills, check out MicroBusiness for Teens.

Teach your kids about investing this summer. Show them how to look up stocks. Then have a little family contest. Have everyone pick a stock and see who’s does best.

Start a garden. Find out what grows well in the summer in your hardiness zone, and then have your kids layout and plant a garden. They’ll love eating the food they’ve grown.

Teach them how to cook. Take them to a kitchen store and show them a bunch of different cooking tools. Build a foundation of basics like how to make a roux and the five mother sauces: béchamel, velouté, espagnole, hollandaise and tomato sauces. Teach them how to wash and cut fruits and veggies, how to blanch, parboil, saute, carmelize, braise and poach.

Make a plan for kids to learn important technology skills like how to type, use PowerPoint and Excel, build a website, do some basic graphic design and use social media for networking and marketing.

 

Let’s all make a pact that we won’t just let our summer days happen to us — we’ll take hold of them, one by one, making everyday count toward a brighter future for our kids.

Leave us comment and let us know what you plan to do to invest your kids’ summer this year.

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of seven kids (ages 1 to 20) including one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

More Posts

How to Be An Outlier

We’re in the midst of talking about education, and I thought it would be appropriate to throw in some words about a few good books. After all, at the end of the day, reading is the most profound form of education for the active learner.

Active learner is the key here. We can shove anything we want down our kids’ throats, and out of obedience or fear of a bad grade and subsequent disapproval (or fear that they won’t get into the right college), they’ll read the thing, but they may not learn. We kicked off this discussion by arguing that our kids are not containers that we can pour information into. They have to be actively engaged in the process if any real learning is going to happen.

That being said, I strongly believe that one of the GREATEST responsibilities of educators is to motivate kids to read and to inspire a love of reading. By the way, parents, whether or not you home school your kids, you ARE educators. In fact, you are your children’s primary educator; they will learn more from you than from all of their elementary, middle and high school teachers combined. Sure, they may get more raw data from their schooling, but they will actually LEARN from you (the good and the bad).

So fill your home with books. Become a reader yourself, if you’re not already. Read to your kids, no matter what their age. I still read to my high schooler, and it is truly some of the most valuable time we have together!

If you do that, you’re already on your way to becoming an Outlier.

Okay, so what is an outlier? It’s a scientific term to describe things or phenomena that lie outside normal experience.

In November 2008, one of my favorite authors Malcolm Gladwell published “Outliers: The Story of Success,” and in it, he took his readers deep into a handful of unique situations and people to discover some key elements of Outliers. I can not encourage you enough to read this book, if you haven’t already. And in spite of a few four letter words, it’s entirely worth having your teens read it as well.

In it, you’ll learn the magic of 10,000 hours. You’ll understand why our brains are more like rice paddies than wheat fields but also why many geniuses seem to have a propensity for failure. You’ll learn why a surprisingly large percentage of Canadian ice hockey players are born in the first few months of the year and why Bill Gates and Steve Jobs were destined for technology greatness. You’ll find out what a Mexican and a South Korean airline have in common that makes them more prone to crashing than other airlines. And why one town in Pennsylvania has an abnormally low incidence of heart disease.

Gladwell’s writing style is engaging and entertaining, and if you’re anything like me, you’ll find Outliers to be a fun read.

Coincidentally, when I first read Outliers, it seemed to be a continuation of another book I’d just read, Talent is Overrated by Geoff Colvin. When I flipped to the back and checked Gladwell’s bibliography, he referenced the book. So, if you read Outliers and find yourself hungry for more, check out Talent is Overrated. It’s not as captivating as Outliers, but the information is great.

Talent

Then, later that same year (2009), I picked up Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, and my hunger for fascinating anomalies was fed once again. Freakonomics was as engaging as Outliers was, but I have warn you that the language is not appropriate for kids, and the opening segment that offers an economist’s explanation for the dramatic drop in crime rates in the 90s was horrifying.

freakonomicsThose issues aside, you will be intrigued, and you will learn and grow from all three of these books. And that will be a step in your journey toward becoming an Outlier!

Happy reading…

 

 

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of seven kids (ages 1 to 20) including one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

More Posts

Do Hard Things

I’m not sure how or when it actually started, but over the past 100 years or so, the word teenager has become synonymous with rebellion in the eyes of the Western world. And although I’m fully aware that this is a lie through and through (rebellion is NOT a natural part of the maturing process), there is one kind of teenage rebellion that I can get behind.

Do Hard Things, written by teen brothers Alex & Brett Harris, touts itself as “a teenage rebellion against low expectations.” They call it a rebelution, and with their book and their popular blog and traveling conventions, they are doing their part to fight against the prevailing caricature of the stereotypical under-achieving, apathetic, incompetent and impotent teenager.

They expose the myth of adolescence and compare the pathetically low expectations of today’s teenagers (make your bed, put gas in the car, do your homework) to the expectations of teenagers during the formation of our country. They introduce us to a young George Washington, as an example, who at the age of 17 was selected to be the official surveyor of Culpeper County, Virginia. For three years, the adults in his life trusted him to measure and record previously unmapped territories. They expected young George to do his job with excellence in spite of the dangers and hardships of the uncharted frontier, brimming with dangerous wildlife and potentially hostile natives.

This book is both educational and inspirational, and it’s a must read for all parents, teens and pre-teens. If we can all join forces and join the rebelution, we are bound to make some mighty changes over the next few decades.

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of seven kids (ages 1 to 20) including one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

More Posts